The Optimism Bias: A Tour of the Irrationally Positive Brain

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Vintage #ad - Drawing on cutting-edge science,  the optimism Bias provides us with startling new insight into the workings of the brain and the major role that optimism plays in determining how we live our lives. In this absorbing exploration, Tali Sharot—one of the most innovative neuroscientists at work today—demonstrates that optimism may be crucial to human existence.

The optimism bias explores how the brain generates hope and what happens when it fails; how the brains of optimists and pessimists differ; why we are terrible at predicting what will make us happy; how emotions strengthen our ability to recollect; how anticipation and dread affect us; how our optimistic illusions affect our financial, professional, and emotional decisions; and more.

The Optimism Bias: A Tour of the Irrationally Positive Brain #ad - Psychologists have long been aware that most people maintain an irrationally positive outlook on life—but why? Turns out, we might be hardwired that way.

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The Influential Mind: What the Brain Reveals About Our Power to Change Others

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Henry Holt and Co. #ad - Sharot shows us how to avoid these pitfalls, and how an attempt to change beliefs and actions is successful when it is well-matched with the core elements that govern the human brain. Relying on the latest research in neuroscience, the book provides fascinating insight into the complex power of influence, behavioral economics and psychology, good and bad.

But how skilled are we at this role, to insisting others are wrong or attempting to exert control―are ineffective, and can we become better? It turns out that many of our instincts―from relying on facts and figures to shape opinions, because they are incompatible with how people’s minds operate.

The Influential Mind: What the Brain Reveals About Our Power to Change Others #ad - Sharot reveals the critical role of emotion in influence, the weakness of data and the power of curiosity. Henry holt. We all have a duty to affect others―from the classroom to the boardroom to social media. A cutting-edge, research-based inquiry into how we influence those around us and how understanding the brain can help us change minds for the better.

In the influential mind, neuroscientist Tali Sharot takes us on a thrilling exploration of the nature of influence.

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The Influential Mind: What the Brain Reveals About Our Power to Change Others

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Picador #ad - A cutting-edge, research-based inquiry into how we influence those around us, and how understanding the brain can help us change minds for the better. In the influential mind, neuroscientist Tali Sharot takes us on a thrilling exploration of the nature of influence. Sharot shows us how to avoid these pitfalls, and how an attempt to change beliefs and actions is successful when it is well-matched with the core elements that govern the human brain.

The Influential Mind: What the Brain Reveals About Our Power to Change Others #ad - Relying on the latest research in neuroscience, behavioral economics, the book provides fascinating insight into the complex power of influence, and psychology, good and bad. We all have a duty to affect others―from the classroom to the boardroom to social media. But how skilled are we at this role, to insisting others are wrong or attempting to exert control―are ineffective, and can we become better? It turns out that many of our instincts―from relying on facts and figures to shape opinions, because they are incompatible with how people’s minds operate.

Sharot reveals the critical role of emotion in influence, the weakness of data and the power of curiosity. Henry holt.

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The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat: And Other Clinical Tales

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Touchstone #ad - Sacks’s splendid and sympathetic telling, deeply human. If inconceivably strange, these brilliant tales remain, in Dr. A great healer, afflicted, sacks never loses sight of medicine’s ultimate responsibility: “the suffering, fighting human subject. Henry holt. In his most extraordinary book, “one of the great clinical writers of the twentieth century” The New York Times recounts the case histories of patients lost in the bizarre, apparently inescapable world of neurological disorders.

The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat: And Other Clinical Tales #ad - Oliver sacks’s the man who mistook his wife for a hat tells the stories of individuals afflicted with fantastic perceptual and intellectual aberrations: patients who have lost their memories and with them the greater part of their pasts; who are no longer able to recognize people and common objects; who are stricken with violent tics and grimaces or who shout involuntary obscenities; whose limbs have become alien; who have been dismissed as retarded yet are gifted with uncanny artistic or mathematical talents.

. Great product! They are studies of life struggling against incredible adversity, and they enable us to enter the world of the neurologically impaired, to imagine with our hearts what it must be to live and feel as they do.

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The Family That Couldn't Sleep: A Medical Mystery

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Random House Trade Paperbacks #ad - Prepare to be enlightened, entertained, and frightened. Katrina firlik, md, author of Another Day in the Frontal Lobe“A great book. D. T. Max deftly unfolds the mysterious prion in all its villainous guises. Although scientists do not fully understand these proteins–how they replicate and wreak such havoc in their victims’ brains–The Family That Couldn’t Sleep reveals their historical, cultural, and scientific place in our world.

In papua new guinea, a primitive tribe is nearly obliterated by a sickness whose chief symptom is uncontrollable laughter. The villain of the family that couldn’t Sleep is the prion, a tiny little protein that causes some of the most terrifying, brain-mangling, creepy diseases known to man. Throw all those other “mad cow” books in the trash: This is the book to read about prions–or whatever you want to call them.

The Family That Couldn't Sleep: A Medical Mystery #ad - Thankfully, from the world of journalism comes D. T. Max has combined the enthralling medical anthropology of Oliver Sacks with the gothic horror of Stephen King to produce a medical detective story that is as intelligent as it is spooky. D. Max unfolds his absorbing narrative with rare grace and makes the science sing.

Michael pollan, author of the omnivore’s dilemma and The Botany of Desire“Much has been written about prions and Mad Cow Disease–nearly all of it is worthless.

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The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right

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Picador #ad - And the insights are making a difference. The checklist Manifesto How to Get Things Right. In his latest bestseller, atul Gawande shows what the simple idea of the checklist reveals about the complexity of our lives and how we can deal with it. The modern world has given us stupendous know-how. Atul gawande makes a compelling argument that we can do better, using the simplest of methods: the checklist.

Yet avoidable failures continue to plague us in health care, the law, government, the financial industry—in almost every realm of organized activity. Henry holt. Already, a simple surgical checklist from the world health Organization designed by following the ideas described here has been adopted in more than twenty countries as a standard for care and has been heralded as “the biggest clinical invention in thirty years” The Independent.

The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right #ad - And the reason is simple: the volume and complexity of knowledge today has exceeded our ability as individuals to properly deliver it to people—consistently, correctly, safely. Great product! In riveting stories, he reveals what checklists can do, and how they could bring about striking improvements in a variety of fields, what they can’t, from medicine and disaster recovery to professions and businesses of all kinds.

We train longer, specialize more, use ever-advancing technologies, and still we fail.

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The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread

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Yale University Press #ad - Henry holt. Great product! The social dynamics of “alternative facts”: why what you believe depends on who you know why should we care about having true beliefs? And why do demonstrably false beliefs persist and spread despite bad, rather than individual psychology, consequences for the people who hold them?   Philosophers of science Cailin O’Connor and James Weatherall argue that social factors, even fatal, are what’s essential to understanding the spread and persistence of false beliefs.

The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread #ad - But if that’s right, ” and disputes over the validity of everything from climate change to the size of inauguration crowds, written for a political era riven by “fake news, then why is it apparently irrelevant to many people whether they believe true things or not?  The Misinformation Age, ” “alternative facts, shows convincingly that what you believe depends on who you know.

If social forces explain the persistence of false belief, we must understand how those forces work in order to fight misinformation effectively. It might seem that there’s an obvious reason that true beliefs matter: false beliefs will hurt you. The checklist Manifesto How to Get Things Right.

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Narrative Economics: How Stories Go Viral and Drive Major Economic Events

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Princeton University Press #ad - Using a rich array of historical examples and data, depressions, prepare for, and lessen the damage of financial crises, Shiller argues that studying popular stories that affect individual and collective economic behavior―what he calls "narrative economics"―has the potential to vastly improve our ability to predict, recessions, and other major economic events.

Spread through the public in the form of popular stories, that housing prices never fall, ideas can go viral and move markets―whether it's the belief that tech stocks can only go up, or that some firms are too big to fail. The checklist Manifesto How to Get Things Right. Narrative economics explains how we can begin to take these stories seriously.

Narrative Economics: How Stories Go Viral and Drive Major Economic Events #ad - . Henry holt. From nobel prize–winning economist and new york times bestselling author robert shiller, can we afford to ignore the power of viral stories to affect economies? In this groundbreaking book, a new way to think about how popular stories help drive economic eventsIn a world in which internet troll farms attempt to influence foreign elections, Nobel Prize–winning economist and New York Times bestselling author Robert Shiller offers a new way to think about the economy and economic change.

Whether true or false, by the news media, and increasingly by social media―drive the economy by driving our decisions about how and where to invest, how much to spend and save, stories like these―transmitted by word of mouth, and more. Narrative economics sets out to change that by laying the foundation for a way of understanding how stories help propel economic events that have had led to war, mass unemployment, and increased inequality.

The stories people tell―about economic confidence or panic, the American dream, housing booms, or Bitcoin―affect economic outcomes.

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Learned Optimism: How to Change Your Mind and Your Life

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Vintage #ad - National bestsellerthe father of the new science of positive psychology and author of Authentic Happiness draws on more than twenty years of clinical research to demonstrate how optimism enchances the quality of life, and how anyone can learn to practice it. Offering many simple techniques, Dr. The checklist Manifesto How to Get Things Right.

Great product! Seligman explains how to break an “i—give-up” habit, develop a more constructive explanatory style for interpreting your behavior, and experience the benefits of a more positive interior dialogue. These skills can help break up depression, better develop your potential, boost your immune system, and make you happier.

Learned Optimism: How to Change Your Mind and Your Life #ad - . With generous additional advice on how to encourage optimistic behavior at school, at work and in children, Learned Optimism is both profound and practical–and valuable for every phase of life. Vaulted me out of my funk. So, fellow moderate pessimists, go buy this book. Marian sandmaier, the New York Times Book Review Henry holt.

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The Soul of a Doctor: Harvard Medical Students Face Life and Death

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Algonquin Books #ad - They show, often painfully, how medical students grow up, right at the bedside. By the time most of us meet our doctors, they've been in practice for a number of years. Here are voices of third-year students just as they begin to take on clinical responsibilities. Learned optimism How to Change Your Mind and Your Life.

Their words focus on the odd transition students face when they must deal with real people in real time and in real crises and when they must learn to put aside their emotions to make quick, accurate, and sensitive decisions. Often they seem aloof, uncaring, and hurried. Henry holt. The checklist Manifesto How to Get Things Right.

The Soul of a Doctor: Harvard Medical Students Face Life and Death #ad - Moving, their true stories show us a side of the profession that few ever see, and candid, disturbing, or could even imagine. Of course, they're not all like that, and most didn't start out that way. Great product! Used book in Good Condition. Their decisions aren't always right, and the consequences can be life-altering-for all involved.

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Optimism Bias: Why We're Wired to Look on the Bright Side by Tali Sharot 2012-01-01

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Robinson Publishing #ad - The checklist Manifesto How to Get Things Right. Used book in Good Condition. Henry holt. Great product! Learned optimism How to Change Your Mind and Your Life.

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